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Optoma ST320E: Hardware 


 


 

 



Optoma 320E Thin Client

Specifications

The Optoma ST320E is a small and neat unit that appears to be based on the Geode GX1 thin client reference design. There is no date of manufacture on the unit but I can see that the plastic base was injection moulded on the 4th December 2002. This model is also badged and sold as a Fujitsu Siemens Futro B100.

The basic specs for the ST320E are:

Processor
   Type
   Speed
GX1
300MHz
Memory
   Flash
   RAM
32MB (max ?)
64Mb (max 512MB)
Video
   Chip
   Max resolution
CS5530A
1600 x 1200 32-bit colour
Ports
   Network
   USB
   Serial
   Parallel
   PS/2
10/100
2 x USB1.1
1
1
Kybd & mouse
Power
   Off
   Running
0 W
~10W
Dimensions
H x W x D (mm)173 x 48 x 160 (Excluding Stand)

The operating system is Windows CE .NET v4.0. The software build date is 01/07/2003.

The Fujitsu Siemens badged version runs eLux - see www.myelux.com.

Power Supply

The ST320E uses a small external power supply that provides a 5V 2A supply.

Expansion

Circuit Board

On opening up the ST320 you find that the flash memory fitted is on a small daughter board plugged into a 44-pin IDE interface tucked away in the corner. (Bottom left in the photo). I've removed the the flash module and replaced it by 2.5" drive which had Tinycore Linux v2.7 installed. This booted and ran quite happily. In order to be able to push on the IDE connector I had to break off the thin plastic guides that are fitted at each end of the IDE connector. (See the board photos for more detail).

The RAM is also expandable although this is not immediately evident. The RAM is a PC133 144-pin SODIMM that is fitted underneath the main circuit board. This does mean that you have to spend a few minutes taking the unit apart in order to be able to access it. The most fiddly part of this is removing the small mounting pillar in the corner by the IDE connector. I ended up screwing the board mounting screw back into the pillar before using a pair of long nosed pliers to loosen it. Then it was a simple matter to use a screwdriver to remove it.

Click on the photograph to get a more detailed view of the circuit board.

 


Any comments? email me.    Last update April 2010