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Wyse Xn0L: Hardware 


 


 

 



Wyse X90L Wyse X90L connections

The Xn0L is a family of laptop style thin clients. My example is an X90L. I originally purchased an X90LE some time ago that was "...working when put away and not working when I got it back out of the cupboard". My hope that it was just a battery issue was wrong - it was as exactly described: Dead. Recently (December 2011) I bought an X90L, this one one being described as working but the LCD screen had been removed to repair another laptop. It was the work of a few minutes to remove the screenless lid from the new one and replace it by the screen+lid from the old one. Result: One worker.

This X90L was manufactured in May 2009.

The Wyse blurb reads:

The Wyse X class mobile thin computers feature high-performance energy conserving Via C7-M ULV processors, giving your mobile users all the processing power and flexibility they need including rich multimedia playback. Choose between the Wyse X90/X90e with a crisp 12.1" display and the Wyse X50L/90L & X90Le with the larger 15.4" widescreen display. All deliver excellent performance for graphics applications and multimedia presentations.

Specifications

Processor
   Type
   Speed
VIA C7-M ULV
1200 MHz
Chipset
 VN896
Memory
   Flash
   RAM
1GB
1GB (Max 4GB?)
Video
   Screen15.4" XVGA Widescreen 1280 x 800
   Chip
   Max resolution
integrated in CN896
up to ? x ? 32-bit colour
Ports
   Display

   Network

   USB
   Serial
   Parallel
   PS/2
1 VGA port 15-pin D-Sub for external monitor (clone mode)
1 DVI-D port for external monitor (clone mode)
10/100/1000
Integrated Wireless 802.11b/g/n
4 x USB2.0
none
none
none
Power
   Battery6 cell Li-Ion 4400mAH
   Off
   Running
0W
~16W
Dimensions
H x W x D (mm)39.7 x 360 x 260

The operating system is Windows XPe SP2.

CPU

For those to whom it matters here is some detail from Linux's /proc/cpuinfo

vendor_id:CentaurHauls
cpu family:6
model:13
model name:VIA C7-M Processor 1200MHz
stepping:0

lspci

The output from Linux's lspci utility:

00:00.0 Host bridge: VIA Technologies, Inc. CN896/VN896/P4M900 Host Bridge
00:00.1 Host bridge: VIA Technologies, Inc. CN896/VN896/P4M900 Host Bridge
00:00.2 Host bridge: VIA Technologies, Inc. CN896/VN896/P4M900 Host Bridge
00:00.3 Host bridge: VIA Technologies, Inc. CN896/VN896/P4M900 Host Bridge
00:00.4 Host bridge: VIA Technologies, Inc. CN896/VN896/P4M900 Host Bridge
00:00.5 PIC: VIA Technologies, Inc. CN896/VN896/P4M900 I/O APIC Interrupt Controller
00:00.6 Host bridge: VIA Technologies, Inc. CN896/VN896/P4M900 Security Device
00:00.7 Host bridge: VIA Technologies, Inc. CN896/VN896/P4M900 Host Bridge
00:01.0 PCI bridge: VIA Technologies, Inc. VT8237/VX700 PCI Bridge
00:02.0 PCI bridge: VIA Technologies, Inc. CN896/VN896/P4M900 PCI to PCI Bridge Controller (rev 80)
00:03.0 PCI bridge: VIA Technologies, Inc. CN896/VN896/P4M900 PCI to PCI Bridge Controller (rev 80)
00:0f.0 IDE interface: VIA Technologies, Inc. VT82C586A/B/VT82C686/A/B/VT823x/A/C PIPC Bus Master IDE (rev 07)
00:10.0 USB Controller: VIA Technologies, Inc. VT82xxxxx UHCI USB 1.1 Controller (rev b0)
00:10.1 USB Controller: VIA Technologies, Inc. VT82xxxxx UHCI USB 1.1 Controller (rev b0)
00:10.2 USB Controller: VIA Technologies, Inc. VT82xxxxx UHCI USB 1.1 Controller (rev b0)
00:10.3 USB Controller: VIA Technologies, Inc. VT82xxxxx UHCI USB 1.1 Controller (rev b0)
00:10.4 USB Controller: VIA Technologies, Inc. USB 2.0 (rev 90)
00:11.0 ISA bridge: VIA Technologies, Inc. VT8237S PCI to ISA Bridge
00:11.7 Host bridge: VIA Technologies, Inc. VT8237/8251 Ultra VLINK Controller
00:13.0 PCI bridge: VIA Technologies, Inc. VT8237A Host Bridge
00:13.1 PCI bridge: VIA Technologies, Inc. VT8237A PCI to PCI Bridge
01:00.0 VGA compatible controller: VIA Technologies, Inc. CN896/VN896/P4M900 [Chrome 9 HC] (rev 01)
02:00.0 Network controller: Ralink corp. RT2860
04:01.0 Audio device: VIA Technologies, Inc. VT8237A/VT8251 HDA Controller (rev 10)
05:06.0 CardBus bridge: Texas Instruments PCIxx12 Cardbus Controller
05:06.2 Mass storage controller: Texas Instruments 5-in-1 Multimedia Card Reader (SD/MMC/MS/MS PRO/xD)
05:06.3 SD Host controller: Texas Instruments PCIxx12 SDA Standard Compliant SD Host Controller
05:06.4 Communication controller: Texas Instruments PCIxx12 GemCore based SmartCard controller
05:07.0 Ethernet controller: Realtek Semiconductor Co., Ltd. RTL-8110SC/8169SC Gigabit Ethernet (rev 10)

Power Supply

The external power supply is rated at 19V 3.42A.

Features

Under the keyboard of a Wyse XL90 Memory expansion a Wyse XL90

You need to remove the keyboard in order to gain access to some of the memory components. There is also access on the bottom to an additional memory slot and the wireless card.

To remove the keyboard you first need to pop off the panel above the keyboard that carries the on-off switch. There is no need to remove any screws beforehand. It is advisable to disconnect the power and remove the battery before attempting to dismantle the X90L.

You can see a picture of the dismantled X90LE here.

Memory

Flash/Disk: The Xn0L has a single 44-pin IDE connector. This is located under the keyboard. Unfortunately there is not much internal space and it would be difficult to fit in anything other than the standard flash module.

Ram: There are two SODIMM sockets to take the RAM. The first is located under the keyboard whilst the second is behind a panel on the bottom of the case. The RAM fitted is made by Apacer and marked 1GB SOD PC2-5300 CL5. I moved the single SODIMM from underneath to the socket under the keyboard. This means I'm left with the easier job of opening the panel on the bottom should I want to add additional memory to the X90L.

SD Card: There is an SD card slot on left hand side just below the Express card slot.

Express Card Slot

What looks as though it might be a PCMIA card slot is an Express card slot which accepts either ExpressCard/34 or ExpressCard/54 formats.

Wireless

The wireless card is a mini-PCI card which, like the second RAM socket, is located behind a removable panel on the bottom of the case.

Extras

The "e" model adds a smart card reader and bluetooth.

Additional Info

In June 2014 I received an email from Simon Fitch. He had been looking to see the optimum amount of memory to install on his x90LW:

"The VIA info for the motherboard suggests it'll take 4GB of RAM. I have installed 2x 2GB of DDR2 667Mhz RAM and indeed it boots up - but the BIOS and Windows only sees 3GB (even with windows having the 3GB and PAE switches enabled for big RAM).

I've used CPUID to look deeper into this, and indeed both modules are recognised as 2GB modules. However it seems that the motherboard and BIOS only sees 1GB on one module - and that isn't due to a 32bit issue. It turns out that the AGP (Graphics) and PCI memory allocations are taking up most of the area above 3GB, so installing 4GB of RAM isn't much help. As the memory is only single banked, there is no speed benefit from installing 2x 2GB modules. The motherboard seems incapable of supporting dual banked mode and, thanks to the AGP/PCI mapping, you would be wasting 1GB RAM anyway. I've therefore installed 1x 2GB under the keyboard and 1x 1GB in the accessible slot for a maximum of 3GB. All seems to be running well so far.

Other interesting info from CPUID is that the motherboard identifies itself as a 'VIA Development Board' and that the graphics is running on a 8x AGP bus rather than a PCI-Express bus which I was expecting!"

 


Any comments? email me.    Last update June 2014